The Cold Tube: Membrane assisted radiant cooling for condensation free outdoor comfort in the tropics

Our heat flux sensors have been recently used by researchers from the University of Princeton (Eric Teilbaum, Kiam Wee Chen, Forrest Meggers and Dorit Aviv), the University of California (Jovan Pantelic) and the University of British Columbia (Adam Rysanek). The paper is published in the Conference Series of the Journal of Physics.

The paper describes the assessment of an outdoor radiant cooling pavilion which can reduce the environmental temperature by 10 degrees in hot and humid surroundings. The system avoids condensation by separating cold surfaces from the outside air with a membrane transparent to the radiant cooling heat transfer. Researchers used our gSKIN® BodyTEMP Patch to monitor the heat flux and skin temperature of volunteers inside the pavilion.

While this study was conducted outdoors, this demonstration and evaluation will help inform subsequent applications of the technology, such as augmenting comfort in naturally ventilated indoor environments, saving energy while maintaining a comfortable environment.

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