New method for the thermal characterization of window insulation materials developed

In the US, 40% of the total energy use occurs through commercial and residential buildings. This  energy consumption can be reduced significantly through retrofitting. Researchers all over the world are looking for affordable and efficient solutions to decrease energy losses through the building envelope.

For the development of new, energy-efficient building components, an easy-to-use method for the characterization of newly developed products is needed. Traditionally, building components are characterized with a hot box method. However, this requires a sample that is larger than 1m2.

Researchers from the University of Colorado and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology recently developed a new, “reduced-scale” hot box method for the thermal characterization of window insulation materials that can be used for small samples. This new set-up contains greenTEGs gSKIN® XO-heat flux sensor. We are happy to be a part of the energy transition in this way.

 

Full Publication

Xingpeng Zhao et al. (2019): Reduced-scale hot box method for thermal characterization of window insulation materials, Applied Thermal Engineering Vol. 160: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2019.114026

 

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