Quantifying the Thermal Storage Capability of Phase Change Materials

For a better understanding of the behavior of phase change materials (PCMs) and other thermal storage materials, heat flux is an important parameter. Today, PCMs are mostly characterized with the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) method. However, a material’s thermal storage and release characteristics are not only a function of its quality, but also of the integration into a specific application. To replicate the conditions in a Differential Scanning Calorimetry measurement set-up is mostly unfeasible. It therefore makes sense to measure the behavior of a material in-situ which can be done with greenTEG’s heat flux sensors. The thus gathered data can then help to optimize the integration of the material in the application.

Application Examples

At the University of Applied Science in Lucerne Fischer and his team integrated the gSKIN®- Heat Flux Sensor into a heat exchanger to characterize the storage capacity of ice for building applications. Read the abstract for the presentation at the IERS conference here.

GLASSX, a company providing highly efficient PCM based windows, used the U-Value £Kit with the gSKIN®-XP  Heat Flux Sensor to validate their thermal storage model for product improvements. Read the German publication or the English summary

Contact us if you would like to discuss your application. We look forward to supporting you with our expertise in thermal engineering.

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